A Guide to Buying and Understanding Video Games

In the early 1990s, video games were considered toys, used only by children. As games became more realistic, some people became concerned with their effect on impressionable minds. As a result, Sega became a pioneer in ratings for video games, leading to the ESRB ratings that we know today. Tonight’s museum post, circa 1993, features a brochure from Sega explaining video games, and their new rating system, to concerned parents.

I don’t think that anyone can argue that the current video game rating system is a bad thing for consumers, but in the early 90s there was an air of a witch-hunt, and the mob mentality was real. Even today, whenever kids pick up guns, one of the first things people want to blame is video games. People simply refuse to take a look at themselves and how their behavior (or lack thereof), affects children. It’s always easier to blame someone else for your problems, right? Well, luckily, despite mother and father never talking to me about video games, despite playing Mortal Kombat and Doom back in those days, I avoided pulling out anyone’s spine and melting them with a BFG 9000, and none of my contemporaries did, either.

As always, hope you’ve enjoyed this museum post!

Sega Guide to Buying and Understanding Video Games

Sega Guide to Buying and Understanding Video Games

Sega Guide to Buying and Understanding Video Games

Sega Guide to Buying and Understanding Video Games

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