Pro Wrestling

Pro Wrestling

Pro Wrestling – Sega Master System

For today’s Sega Master System museum post we have Pro Wrestling. This was one of three games my mother bought to appease me after I went through my first surgery (something I wasn’t very happy about). It’s a foggy memory now, but I believe one of the other games was Alex Kidd in Miracle World. Sadly, I can’t remember what the third game was.

If memory serves, the clinic was near or on Connaught Road Central in Hong Kong. Interestingly, I passed through the area quite often while I was working there, taking many meals at Cafe de Coral and Yoshinoya. There are no longer any places that sell video games in that area.

As always, hope you’ve enjoyed this museum post!

Pro Wrestling Manual (PDF, 31.4 MB)

Pro Wrestling

Pro Wrestling

Sega game #5056

Pro Wrestling

Pro Wrestling

Pro Wrestling

Further reading:
Pro Wrestling at Sega Retro
Pro Wrestling at SMS Power!
Pro Wrestling on Wikipedia

Parlour Games

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

In terms of time spent playing, Parlour Games is one of my favorite Sega games of all time. As a kid, I really liked snooker (aka billiards or pool) and this was the first game that allowed me to play as much as I wanted. I was super happy on that day when we stumbled upon the game at Toy Liquidators. Prior to that I could only rent the game from Vimy Video; I’m sure I rented it more than once.

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

Another memory associated with this game is taking this game to my cousins’ place and playing it with them. Whenever we got a scratch in billiards, the game would play a sound. I’d mimic the sound with my own invented syllables, and my cousin would mimic me. Good times, though sometimes the game would glitch after a scratch and play the sound indefinitely. That was pretty grating.

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

If I ever got tired of billiards, I could play Darts or World Bingo. I mastered Darts pretty quickly, but World Bingo was a lot harder. It was kind of an odd game to me because it was a game of chance. My mind couldn’t really process the fact that there are some games with uncertain outcomes. I was used to doing X to get Y. Later, I noticed that if I bet really fast, more types of rewards would show up. I started playing the game with my rapid fire unit. 😀

Below is a video of me playing each game in 2015. Didn’t realize how good the computer was, or maybe my skills have deteriorated over the years. As always, hope you’ve enjoyed this museum post!

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

Parlour Games - Sega Master System

Further reading:
Parlour Games on Sega Retro
Parlour Games on SMS Power!

Super NES Controller – Manual Cover

SNES Controller Manual - Cover

Tonight’s museum post is of the cover of a manual for an SNES controller. Since I recently posted about the iBuffalo controller, it seems appropriate now to post this manual.

As I’ve mentioned here many times before, I was a Sega kid growing up. Of course, however, like everyone else, in 1991 I discovered Street Fighter II. When it was finally released on a console, it came out on the SNES, and again like everyone else, I had to get it. I had finally ventured over to the dark side. My mom got me the Control Set and a copy of the game. I don’t remember when I got this additional controller.

I think I remember scanning this manual, too. It was the holidays in 2008, and I came back to clean out my room. As with many other items in the museum, I took a record of it so that I could throw it out at any time. I don’t remember if I threw it out then. I haven’t seen it since so I probably did.

As always, hope you’ve enjoyed this museum post!

Bowmore Islay Single Malt, Aged 12 Years

Bowmore was the last bottle of Scotch I bought in Hong Kong before returning to the United States. I remember I was having a particularly bad morning at work, and later some of the guys started talking about whisky so on my lunch break I took the MTR over to Central and bought it. Knowing that I was returning to the U.S., those last few weeks in HK I spent money much more freely. I probably scared my coworkers.

This is the first Scotch museum post featuring both the bottle and the box. Cheers!

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Bowmore 12 Years Old

Rocky

When we were kids, my parents would try to keep it fair when it came time for gifts. I’d get to pick something I liked, and my sister would pick something she liked. Most of the time, she would pick a Barbie or a My Little Pony, but on certain occasions she would pick a Sega game. Rocky is one of those games.

Rocky - Sega Master System

Twice the Mega Power!

Like Kung Fu Kid, I remember getting this while we lived in Kowloon Tong. There was a time when I could tell you how I acquired each and every one of our (well, mostly my) Sega games, but that time is long gone now. I know that I picked a game for myself, but now I can’t remember which one. Was it Zillion II? Did we get this game from Lok Fu? There’s no way to know now.

Rocky - Sega Master System

Made in Japan

Rocky - Sega Master System

Rocky – 7002

If memory serves, it was initially physically impossible for us to beat this game due to the stringent training required in the game. In the first fight against Apollo Creed, you needed 90+ connects on the bag, which was physically possible but taxing. In the second fight against Clubber Lang, you needed something like 7 punches per second in order to get good enough to beat Ivan Drago later on. It’s pretty much impossible to sustain that rate for the minute or so requirement.

Rocky - Sega Master System

Please excuse the drawing… remember, this was my sister’s cartridge

Rocky - Sega Master System

Rocky - Sega Master System

Rocky - Sega Master System

Later on, I chanced upon a Rapid Fire Unit (which will have its own museum post one of these days) which finally enabled us to beat the game. I was able to use this unit tonight to do a complete playthrough of the game:

For reference, I hooked up my Sega Master System to an old GeForce Ti4400 with VIVO and recorded on the highest quality setting (640×480). Since the recording was in stereo and the SMS is mono, I then re-encoded with Handbrake and set the audio to mono in order to get sound coming out of both speakers. Normally I would use Kega Fusion to save time, but since there’s no rapid-fire setting in that emulator, it would not have been possible to beat the game.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this trip down memory lane!

Rocky manual (PDF, 59.8 MB)

Further reading:
Rocky on Sega Retro
Rocky on Wikipedia
Rocky on SMS Power!

Beef Gunkan

Sen-Ryo Beef Tartare Gunkan

Sen-Ryo Beef Tartare Gunkan – March 31, 2015

I love going to conveyor-belt sushi restaurants because you never know what you’re going to get, and you (theoretically) should get a nice selection. Sadly, in too many conveyor-belt sushi restaurants the establishment is more concerned with not wasting food and maximizing profits, resulting in the same stuff going around, over and over, even during peak dinner hours.

If you’re lucky, you’ll get a nice steak tartare gunkan, like I did here on March 31, 2015. Bon appetit!

National NEO Hi-Top AA Batteries

For this museum post we have a couple of National NEO Hi-Top AA batteries.

National NEO Hi-Top AA Battery

EXTRA HEAVY DUTY – Matsushita Electric 05:98

These batteries have been sitting in this Genesis Control Pad box for probably at least 20 years. I don’t even remember where I got them from – based on some googling and finding out how old they are, it would seem that most likely I brought them over from Hong Kong when we first moved here (though the “05:97” and “05:98” markings on the batteries suggest they could be from the 90s). They could have been inside one of my mini-4WD racers, or a Lego Light & Sound unit. I know for sure that I didn’t get them in the U.S.

National NEO Hi-Top AA Battery

Made in Japan – UM-E·NE 1.5V – Size “AA” (R6)

I was originally planning to toss them out after putting them in the museum, but now that I see how old they are I think I’ll leave them on my bookshelf for a while. As you can see from the pictures, they’ve held up pretty well over the years, with no leakage or bulges. Maybe they really do not make them like they used to!

National NEO Hi-Top AA Battery

National NEO Hi-Top AA Battery

Some links of interest:
Panasonic Company History
1985 TV Commercial

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

Continuing with the theme from the previous museum post, tonight we have an iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad.

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

I was browsing around Yahoo Auctions HK when I happened upon this controller for $88. Turns out that the store was near our house, so with a long weekend coming up I asked JC to stop by and get it for me.

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

At first I thought it was a disappointment as it felt super light and didn’t feel much like the SNES controller I remember growing up with. Once I played a few more games and got a little bit more immersed, however, I realized that the size and feel was close enough so that once I got really into a game, I didn’t really have to think and adjust like I have to with a PSone or other non-SNES controller. The other thing I realized is that two of the buttons on this controller are convex instead of concave like on the original SNES pad (the Japanese Super Famicom has all-convex buttons).

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

For HKD$88 (less than USD$12), I’d say that even if the experience isn’t perfect at first, it’s worth having a second look. As always, hope you enjoyed this museum post!

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad

iBuffalo Classic USB Gamepad