Page from MicroTimes December 9, 1992

Last Friday we had the page from Computer Currents, and today we have a page from MicroTimes. It is so strange that I ripped out single pages from both of these magazines, with no apparent reason. Even stranger is that I kept them in the blue bag for a couple of decades or more.

Page 31 is is an ad for a computer that sold printers. Maybe I was looking to upgrade to a fancy laser printer. Page 32 is an ad from a mom & pop, white-box, brown-box, OEM, clone, whatever-term-you-want-to-use computer store that was so prevalent back then. I’ll take the 486DX-50 with local bus, please!

MicroTimes - December 9, 1992 - Page 31

MicroTimes - December 9, 1992 - Page 32

Introduction to Hong Kong Museum of History (1982)

Introduction to Hong Kong Museum of History (1982)

For this Friday afternoon museum post I’m delighted to bring you this 1982 introductory booklet to the Hong Kong Museum of History.

I first visited the museum in 2007, when I went to Hong Kong by myself. In later years, I took JC there as well. It’s really a fascinating glimpse into Hong Kong’s past and gives a nice outline of Hong Kong’s story (pun somewhat intended as the permanent exhibit at the museum is called “Hong Kong Story”). Who knew that I had a booklet from there all this time?

The details are murky now, but I am 100% certain that my father gave me this booklet. He either brought it over to me here in the United States, or I saw it at his house or office and picked it up with interest, and he gave it to me. There was a boarding pass stub tucked between the back cover and last page from one of the summers when I returned to Hong Kong as a teenager, so it’s probably the latter.

Being a PhD of history, my father liked to keep these types of old things (and being the son of a history buff, I suppose I do, too). At the time he gave me the booklet, it was already over a decade old. Now, it is 35 years old, and has spent at least the past 20 years inside that blue shoulder bag that was also given to me by my father. Amazingly, both the booklet and bag still smell like him, even though he himself has been gone for over 20 years.

In my current state of mid-life crisis, I am embracing minimalism to “lighten my load”, so to speak. For most people, it’s probably normal to own a lot of stuff, and after a few decades on this Earth it’s not uncommon to have roomfuls of things collected throughout the years. When my father died and we had to go back and claim his things at the university, there was an entire storeroom of books and papers. But I wonder if he, like me, ever looked at all those things that he saved and kept in his closet and on his bookshelves. What do we hope to gain by saving all this stuff? Will we take it with us when we leave, or will everything just get shoved into a broom closet/storeroom? It doesn’t make sense to keep things we will never use or even look at, but we still do it.

So that’s probably why I’m scanning all this stuff and putting it out here. At least here, someone from the internet might stumble upon it and look at it with fascination like I did that one day in my dad’s room. Life keeps moving forward in many different directions, and one little spark of interest could change the course of someone’s life, even if that spark comes from the past. No, we shouldn’t live there, but sometimes it’s nice to pay a visit.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this trip down memory lane.

Introduction to Hong Kong Museum of History (PDF, 18.8 MB)

Sega Embossed Envelope, 1988

In this previous post about a game list that Sega sent to me in Hong Kong, I mentioned an envelope with a blue Sega logo that I thought I had misplaced. Well, it turns out that I kept all my Sega envelopes in the blue shoulder bag. So now, here it is, the first ever piece of correspondence I received from Sega, postmarked September 1, 1988.

What’s really special about this envelope is that the Sega logo on the upper left is embossed. Later envelopes, even as early as November 29, 1988 (postmark of the second envelope I received), had a flat logo. After a while, even the flat logo was replaced with an ink stamp. In total, there were 21 Sega envelopes in the blue bag (and not including Sega Visions envelopes), which gives you an idea of how much I used to bug Sega with my requests!

The embossing is visible in the full-envelope scan, but I’ve included a 600 DPI scan of just the logo as well. Enjoy!

Sega Embossed Envelope 1988
Postmarked September 1, 1988
Embossed Sega Logo 1988
Embossed logo scanned at 600 DPI

Electronic Arts “Get Real!” Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Here’s an earlier Sega Genesis from Electronic Arts, circa 1991, with their “Get Real!” slogan from that period. Unlike some of the later mailers, this mailer lacks full color, containing only orange, black, and white.

That’s all for today. See you tomorrow.

Electronic Arts "Get Real!" Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Electronic Arts "Get Real!" Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Electronic Arts "Get Real!" Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Electronic Arts "Get Real!" Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Electronic Arts "Get Real!" Sega Genesis Mailer (1991)

Wong’s Kong King Hong Kong Market Sega Master System Brochure (~1986)

Tonight’s first scan is a Chinese-language Sega Master System brochure from around 1986, printed by Wong’s Kong King, the Sega distributor in Hong Kong at that time. As can be seen from the tape and staple holes, I also had this on my wall, but like everything else from the blue shoulder bag, it’s just been in there for the past 20 years.

In terms of historical value, this one’s must be pretty high. I’m reluctant to throw it out because like all anachronistic things, it survived a long period of time and made it to the present, something that’s neither easily done, nor repeatable.

When I was putting the other blue shoulder bag items in the recycling bag, it occurred to me that every single moment of our lives is also unique and also won’t come back once gone. So, you get to make a choice. You could either fixate on what’s gone by, filling your present moments with them, or you can focus on the present moments, truly feeling and experiencing them. Of course, if you have enough time (not sure if pun is intended or not), you can try to do both, but picking from the three choices is extremely difficult, and we probably have different desires at different stages of life. For me, right now, a big reason to bid the past goodbye is that I no longer want to be shackled by childhood, and all the unhealthy things that go along with it. JC and I were free, living our own lives, and two years ago we decided to come back “home” and have lived with our parents ever since. It’s possible that we never were truly free, since our parents’ places was like home base, and we left a lot of our stuff here. I grow increasingly tired with this situation and am maneuvering to finally break free, with nothing left behind, and nothing to come back to. We want to make our own home and experience our own moments.

The grind continues…

Sega Master System Hong Kong Brochure from Wong's Kong King, 1986

Sega Master System Hong Kong Brochure from Wong's Kong King, 1986

Electronic Arts Sega Genesis Buy 2 Get 1 Free Promo Mailer/Poster (1992)

This last scan of the afternoon is a mailer from Electronic Arts for a buy 2 Sega Genesis games, get 1 free promotion, circa 1992. From the order form, it’s not clear whether you have to buy directly from EA to qualify for the promotion. Still, even if it wasn’t possible to buy the games at a store (where you might receive a discount from the MSRP), the free game made it a worthwhile deal.

It’s been a busy afternoon. Time to take a break!

Electronic Arts Sega Genesis Buy 2 Get 1 Free Promo & Poster (1992)

Electronic Arts Sega Genesis Buy 2 Get 1 Free Promo & Poster (1992)

Electronic Arts Sega Genesis Buy 2 Get 1 Free Promo & Poster (1992)

Electronic Arts Sega Genesis Buy 2 Get 1 Free Promo & Poster (1992)

Nintendo Power “State of the Art” Subscription Promo (1991)

Here’s another promo for Nintendo Power, likely from 1991 based on the Mega Man issue shown inside. Based on the “State of the Art” copy on the cover, this brochure probably came with my Super Nintendo.

Looking at these brochures now, it’s kind of cool that you also get a gift with your subscription. This brochure offers a player’s guide for all the Mario games, while the brochure in the previous post offered a guide on current Super NES games. These guides were of good quality, too (still have my Mario Paint guide somewhere). Sadly, at the time I never considered subscribing to Nintendo Power. As far as I was concerned, I only ventured to the dark side so I could play Street Fighter II.

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)