Nintendo Power “State of the Art” Subscription Promo (1991)

Here’s another promo for Nintendo Power, likely from 1991 based on the Mega Man issue shown inside. Based on the “State of the Art” copy on the cover, this brochure probably came with my Super Nintendo.

Looking at these brochures now, it’s kind of cool that you also get a gift with your subscription. This brochure offers a player’s guide for all the Mario games, while the brochure in the previous post offered a guide on current Super NES games. These guides were of good quality, too (still have my Mario Paint guide somewhere). Sadly, at the time I never considered subscribing to Nintendo Power. As far as I was concerned, I only ventured to the dark side so I could play Street Fighter II.

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

Nintendo Power State of the Art Subscription Promo (1991)

After Burner – A Ride You’ll Never Forget (1988)

First scan of the day is this After Burner poster and game lineup from Sega, circa 1988. I actually posted a version of this back in 2013, but that was before I learned how to use the panorama feature in Photoshop to stitch the scanned pieces together. For a manually compiled poster, that one looked alright, but this one is just a little bit cleaner. Enjoy!

Poster - After Burner - A Ride You'll Never Forget - 1988

Game Lineup - After Burner - A Ride You'll Never Forget - 1988

Take Hold of the Sega Adventure (1987)

Here’s another poster straight off the wall of my childhood room, a Sega 1987 poster and game lineup, “Take Hold Of The Sega Adventure” and “Get In Touch With Sega Software”.

I really like this one. Looking at it now, I am reminded of many nights before bed looking at all the games that I already had for my Sega Master System, and all the games that I wanted to get. Since this poster came out in 1987, a lot of the games were from around the time when I first got the system as a kid in Hong Kong. Some of the games would remind me of my time in Hong Kong, playing them at my friends’ houses. Now that I think about it, it seemed like all the kids in my little circle of international-school friends had Sega, and I wonder why we never got into Nintendo.

There was one game that I remember playing, Great Football, that I had no idea how to play. I had not yet moved to America and learned the game. Great Soccer was another game that I played at a friend’s place, but of course we knew how to play that, being in British Hong Kong. It was always interesting going to your friends’ homes as a kid. It seemed like each place had its own smell, and different parents had different levels of hospitality. Actually (and speaking of hospitality), I do remember one Japanese kid who had a Famicom at his house. I think he had the floppy drive, too.

Looking at the poster now, I also wonder why it took me twenty years to take it out of the blue bag, unfold it, and actually look at it like I used to (it really is a cool poster). Did I just not have time? Or did I think I had all the time in the world? I think it must have been the latter. At the time we moved out of my childhood home, I was starting my second year of college. Studying happened, girls happened, then graduation, then vacation. Next was first job out of college, unrealistic expectations, get fired, then 3 years of not working. Then, it was start over, find a new job, do well, move out, get a car, get married, get promoted, get burned out, and go on Adventure 2012, and then the last 4 years: move to Hong Kong, live free for one year, work for one year, come back to the USA, live with parents, work 3 months out of the next 24. In a nutshell, the past 20 years of my life. It was a long time, and in between all those things happening, adding up year after year, I never took the time to look in my closet, look inside the blue bag, and take a look at this poster. I must have figured it would always be there.

What’s next? I don’t know. In these past months, I’ve been taking all these pieces from my life up to this point, scanning or photographing them, and then bidding them goodbye. What am I getting ready for? In the past I’ve mentioned getting light, so that when the time comes, we’ll be able to move. But where? Maybe a new life where I enjoy everything in front of me, where nothing is in the closet. Kind of like when we were kids, when things were simple, and all we had was our Sega, when it was so much easier to focus on one thing because that was all we had. It’s a frequently and incorrectly used word, but I do believe it is ironic that I’m trying to get back to the past by letting go of it. It’s very difficult, and sometimes I want to just keep hanging on, like saving this poster after 20 years of not looking at it. But I think maybe, if I’m not careful, my life will become like this poster, stuck in a closet, stuck in time, and another 20 years will have passed.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this museum post, with extra and nostalgic commentary.

Poster - Take Hold of the Sega Adventure - 1987

Game Lineup - Get in Touch with Sega Software - 1987

Sega Master System II 1990 Catalog/Poster

This Sunday afternoon museum post features a colorful Sega Master System II poster and game lineup from 1990. Chances are that this poster came inside a game, but I don’t think I can say which one with any accuracy. Somehow, I want to say Alex Kidd in Shinobi World since that was one of the later games I acquired for the SMS.

There were a number of mistakes and/or liberties taken with the screenshots appearing on this poster. Both Columns and Mickey Mouse appear to be showing the Genesis versions of the game (perhaps a miscommunication between the marketing department and the truth department?), Wonder Boy III appears to be showing a reversed photo of the original Wonder Boy, both Alex Kidd in Shinobi World and Cyber Shinobi show the same screenshot (which appears to be an earlier version of the former), and Fantasy Zone shows a screenshot of Fantasy Zone II (upon closer inspection of the game description, however, this one is actually a typo in the title which should read Fantasy Zone II).

This was another poster that came off the wall of my childhood apartment, and tape and staple holes are probably visible in the scan. Perhaps due to the white color of the poster, it was a lot harder putting together the various scanned sections in Photoshop (this black Genesis one was a lot easier, for example). The silver gridlines were especially problematic, and the final product shows some slight misalignments which I apologize for. Believe me, I really tried.

Despite the issues, I quite like this one. I hope you do too.

Sega Master System II Poster 1990

Sega Master System II Game Lineup 1990

Capcom Craze Club, Nintendo Lineup (1992)

This last museum post of the day is a brochure/poster for the Capcom Craze Club and a listing of Capcom games available for Nintendo systems in 1992. From the goofiness of the fanny pack to the cheesiness of the kids striking poses, I would guess that Nintendo got their child-friendly tentacles deep into Capcom USA’s marketing department. Now that I think about it, perhaps this is the reason that Capcom chose to use such ugly art for the American release of Street Fighter II.

I don’t recall buying any Capcom games other than Street Fighter II, which means that this brochure probably came with that game. The code CAP-SNS-US seems to suggest this as well. Another interesting tidbit is that the poster was printed in Japan. Back then, games were still being manufactured in Japan so it makes sense from a logistics standpoint that the printed matter would be made in the same location as the cartridge. Looking at my PS3 and PS4 games now, I see that they are “manufactured and printed” in the USA.

As always, I hope you enjoy this final (and goofy!) museum post of the day.

Capcom Craze Club Fanny Pack Offer (1992)

Capcom Craze Club Nintendo Lineup (1992)

Electronic Arts Early 90s Phone Numbers

Here’s a slip of paper containing phone numbers for Electronic Arts, early 1990s. One side is the sales number, the other side is the 900 hint line. Why do something for free when you can charge money for it, right?

I want to say this came from one of those writing-pad style displays that you often see in the cash register area, but I really have no memory of it, just an inkling.

Electronic Arts Early 1990s Sales Number

Electronic Arts Early 1990s Hint Line

Sega Patents Insert

Here’s an unknown artifact from some Sega product of the early 1990s. It could have come from a Sega Genesis system, a Sega CD system, or maybe the 6-button controller. There was a time when I could have identified everything in this blue bag, but that time has long passed. This is what I get for not looking at my stuff in over two decades.

Sega Patents Insert