Sega CD Boot Up

Continuing with yesterday’s trend, here is a video of the American Sega CD boot-up.

I’ve already posted about the circumstances of my Sega CD acquisition so I won’t go into them here. I will add that after owning the Sega CD for a while and having no good games to play on it, I’d turn it on every so often just so I could watch the intro. It really does show off the power of the Sega CD that was, unfortunately, too little too late at that time. Still, something about the boot-up is mesmerizing, and I can just sit and zone out watching it (hence the almost 10 minute length of the video).

Super Hang On

I was listening to some Herzog Zwei background music just now when I realized that it’s been over a year since I last played this game. Just like that it’s been a year, and just like that it’s been 12 days since October started. I actually have a long post coming up that I started working on on October 1 but haven’t gotten around to finishing. Another thing I never got around to finishing was posting a video of Super Hang On that I made back in June of this year. After finishing what I was doing while listening to Herzog, I came in to write and post this quickly before I “don’t get around to it” again.

So, Super Hang On. If I recall correctly, this was the free game I chose from one of the promotions Sega had early during the Genesis’ life. I don’t remember exactly but the idea was that you buy two or three (I think it was three) games, cut out the UPCs, send in the UPCs and receipts, and in return Sega would send you the game of your choice (if available). I have a faint memory of this game arriving at our old house. I can see it still shrink-wrapped. I remember the texture of the clear plastic on the box. This was also before Sega changed the Genesis logo, before they enlarged and added “16-bit Cartridge” underneath it.

In terms of gameplay, there was Arcade mode and Original mode. Arcade mode was pretty straightforward; it was a matter of how long you could keep your attention span because each difficulty level was just a progression of gameplay length. Original was kind of cool. You started off with the shittiest bike possible (compared to the maxed-out bike in Arcade mode, the starting bike was unmaneuverable), being able to upgrade it only after winning races and earning money. I enjoyed reading the descriptions of the parts in the manual (something that’s missing from games these days). My favorite (or at least the most memorable) is the titanium-monocoque frame. It was probably my first encounter with disc and drum brakes as well, and where I learned the difference.

Below is the video of myself playing Arcade mode on the easiest difficulty level. Enjoy!